Tuesday, July 22, 2014

TUTORIAL ::Chevron Stamp::

Hi everyone! Here's a really simple tutorial on how I created my large chevron stamp.

Just a heads up: This one took a good 30 minutes to carve. Make sure you have time to do this - you will not want to rush doing this project!

TUTORIAL:: Chevron Stamp by Martice Smith II

Here's what you'll need: 
Linoleum (or any soft rubber material)
Linoleum / rubber stamp carving kit
Metal ruler
Utility Knife
Pen / Pencil
Self-healing cutting mat

TUTORIAL:: Chevron Stamp supplies by Martice Smith II

STEP 1:: Cut rubber block to your desired size.
For my large chevron stamp, I cut an 8 inch by 3 1/4 inch rectangle.

STEP 2:: Using a metal ruler and pencil / pen, determine the angle.
Draw a line down the center of block.
Next, draw perpendicular lines (the horizontal ones).
(My lines are 1 inch spaced apart.)

TIP: The further apart the lines are, the steeper the chevron angle.

TUTORIAL:: Chevron Stamp by Martice Smith II

STEP 3:: Use your metal ruler to connect the outside corners on each side of the block to the center, vertical line. These lines will form the letter "V".

STEP 4:: Roughly color in which parts of the stamp image WILL NOT be cut away.
(Do you like your image so far? If yes, you're ready to cut! If no, go ahead and tweak it until you like it.)

TUTORIAL:: Chevron Stamp by Martice Smith II

STEP 5:: Start cutting!
Using your linoleum cutters, trim away everything that isn't colored in.
TIP: use the metal ruler as a guide to help you cut super straight lines

TUTORIAL:: Chevron Stamp by Martice Smith II

STEP 6:: Test printing
Roll out some ink and do a test print of your stamp.

TUTORIAL:: Chevron Stamp by Martice Smith II

TUTORIAL:: Chevron Stamp by Martice Smith II
Look how straight those lines are! All thanks to my trusty metal ruler... :)

~~ Below, is an example of how I used an 
alternating chevron pattern to 
create a unique postcard ~~
TUTORIAL:: Chevron Stamp by Martice Smith II
This postcard features: hand-carved chevron stamp, image transfer using package tape, a stenciled flower (using Artistcellar's new Pocket Stencil), and my graffiti handwriting on brown kraft paper.

See how easy this was?! After this tutorial, I carved three more...I'll update this post with photos of them, so please be sure to come back!

UPDATE: here are three more chevron patterns!

TUTORIAL:: Alternating Chevron Stamps by Martice Smith II

TUTORIAL:: Alternating Chevron Stamps by Martice Smith II

TUTORIAL:: Alternating Chevron Stamps by Martice Smith II

TUTORIAL:: Alternating Chevron Stamps by Martice Smith II
side view of stamp; see how thick the rubber block is?! This is how I could use BOTH sides.

TUTORIAL:: Alternating Chevron Stamps by Martice Smith II
Remember: if your block is thick enough, you can use both sides, just like I did with this one.

I really hope my tutorial has inspired you to create your own! Commercial stamps are fine to use, sometimes, but I love the handmade character from making my own.

Go ahead and try carving one (or three!) and add a link to your photo. I'd love to see it!

*side note: this post has been entered in the New Friday Chevron challenge

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12 comments:

  1. Great idea! I need to buy linoleum for making bigger stamps.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Ewa! Yes, try a large one! I cut this piece from a linoleum slab that measured 12x19 inches. I can carve so many more from one purchase! Thanks for visiting :)

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  2. Wow! Wonderful tutorial and well worth the effort - the end result is gorgeous! Thanks for sharing it with us at Frosted Designs!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Megan! I appreciate your kind words and for noticing the effort involved. I'm glad to share it!

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  3. Just a great tutorial !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I love it !!Thanks for sharing!!
    Thanks for playing along with Frosted Designs!!!
    Hugs from Brazil

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    Replies
    1. Hi Cynthia! You're very welcome and thanks for visiting me all the way from the great Brazil :)

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  4. Wow!! Thanks for sharing how you make your chevrons!! Thanks for playing along with Frosted Designs!!!

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    Replies
    1. No problem, Julie! So glad you stopped by to say hello :)

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  5. Excellent tutorial and so creative creating your own stamps. thank you for joining us at Frosted. designs.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Channa! Yes, I think it's very rewarding to carve your own stamps. It's a unique impression and can be so expressive!

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  6. If I decide to use rubber, can you tell me what brand is best? I have carved linoleum before and find it very stiff for printing with. Yours is unmounted, correct?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Roberta! Speedball brand seems to be the most popular. I've heard about a couple of other, "off-beat" materials that also works...try bicycle inner-tube rubber, foam/foam rubber, or cheap erasers.

      Linoleum can be very difficult to carve - I like to warm mine up in the sun for a few minutes.
      Yes, the stamps featured in this post is unmounted. (I'm able to use both sides, which I love doing!)

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