Monday, September 1, 2014

Super Hand-carved Stamp collection

These are some of my recently, hand-carved stamps. Most were created during the printmaking challenge that I had in July and others were carved during my own, personal time.

Carving really isn't that hard at all. Besides a basic carving kit, all you need is patience mixed with enthusiasm and you're well on your way!


Martice Smith II's super handcarved stamp collection

Martice Smith II's super handcarved stamp collection

Martice Smith II's super handcarved stamp collection

Now, I want to take you through my process of carving out the large flower stamp. (I guess this is kinda like a tutorial, BUT I'll be sharing workflow tips + a general step-by-step.)

Martice Smith II's large flower stamp, tutorial
As you can see here, I've started the flower stamp without taking the initial photo! Ooops! Well, look on the right side of this photo (my alternating chevron stamp) and you'll see an example of the First Step, which is, transferring your design to the rubber/linoleum. Those black ink pen marks indicate places that will be carved away.

Martice Smith II's large flower stamp, tutorial
Martice Smith II's large flower stamp, tutorial; detail view
DO NOT try to carve away details first! You'll only be working against yourself. Instead, carve away larger areas FIRST.
 Once you've carved your design, cut the larger portion of the rubber block. KEEP this piece to make smaller stamps!

Martice Smith II's large flower stamp, tutorial

 Now, we're ready to ink up the stamp...but wait - let us admire our handiwork, first....*sigh* Isn't she lovely?! Ok, back to business!

Martice Smith II's large flower stamp, tutorial; inking
I'm using an old phone book as my "inking plate". Roll out some water-soluble, block printing ink. The consistency should be very smooth.

Martice Smith II's large flower stamp, tutorial; detail
The ink is distributed evenly across the entire surface of the stamp. Does yours look like this? If not, take your brayer and roll off excess paint, then apply excess paint to piece of scrap paper.


Time for a test print! Burnish (or gently apply pressure) to the back of the stamp


Martice Smith II's large flower stamp, tutorial
My rubber stamp is pretty thick in size (half an inch), so, I'm able to lift it and stamp onto a piece of scrap paper with a fair amount of ease. Another option is to mount the stamp onto a block of wood, for easier handling.


Martice Smith II's large flower stamp, tutorial
What a beautiful impression! This test print is helpful when determining what areas I need to carve away. I think the center area needs a little more attention...carve more hairy lines and it's a wrap!

So, there you have it! Not too bad, right?

Now, I'll need to figure out what projects to create with my *brand new* large flower stamp! Any suggestions??


Peace,

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20 comments:

  1. It's wonderful!!! Thanks for sharing!!! :) xoxoxox

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    1. You're welcome, Vanessa :) So glad you stopped by. Thank you!

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  2. Replies
    1. Hi Jean, thank you for the great compliment! I agree - the stamps put together like this really puts things into perspective for me. I can see what kinds of shapes, patterns, textures are emerging from my imagination. Stamp carving is a new "habit", now! I love my collection...

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  3. Replies
    1. Thanks Corrine. Yes! Carving really is that easy! I hope the tips I shared helped you in some way. Try making some...and don't forget to show me!

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  4. love your stamps, you inspired me so much I have ordered the equipment to try it myself.

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    1. Yayy, Lynda! That's what I like to hear :) I'm proud of you for trying new things. You'll do a fantastic job, yourself ;) Keep me posted on your progress!

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  5. Oh I'm so impressed. I've often thought about making a stamp but didn't know how to do about it.
    Thanks so much for sharing 'the tutorial' I'm now thinking I'll give it a go!
    Have a great day

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    1. Neesie, so great to see you here and to read your comment. Thank you. Just start small and grow from there. I think you'll love carving your own stamps. You can do it, Neesie!

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  6. Terrific tutorial, and lovely stamps.

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    1. Thank you Win! So glad you enjoyed my tutorial and stamps.

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  7. What a gorgeous flower stamp! Thanks for the tutorial.

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    1. Beverley, thank you for the compliment! You're very welcome for the tutorial. Be sure to check out my chevron tutorial, too...you know how cute those chevrons are on page layouts!

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  8. WONDERFUL!!! I love your stamp and think it would make a cute border on some dish towels, little canvas bag…anything like that. Art journaling too, of course!

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    1. Hi Sue! Yes, I agree! I've done a couple of small canvas pouches for my drawing pencils. I have a feature in HeART Journal Magazine where I share how to incorporate stamps and stencils in your art journaling. (Look for the issue in my sidebar!)

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  9. Martice - I LOVE your hand-carved stamps!! I hand-carved 3 stamps & it's HARD!!! My hand tends to "slip" & cut where I don't want any cuts! I compliment you on the intricacies of your carvings.
    Grandma Nancy in central IL

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  10. Yum! Love all that detail! So exciting to make the first impression with a newly carved stamp. Love.

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